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Types of Mosquitoes

There are more than 2,700 mosquito species in the world, 13 of which live in the United States. Most belong to the following three:
 
Aedes: Sometimes called "floodwater" mosquitoes, because flooding is important for their eggs to hatch, include the Yellow-Fever Mosquito, and the Asian Tiger Mosquito. They are capable of traveling up to 75 miles from their breeding sites, and bite mammals – particularly humans – mainly at dawn and dusk.  Their abdomens have pointed tips.  
 
Anopheles:These mosquitoes breed in bodies of permanent fresh water, and include several species, including the Common Malaria Mosquito. Anopheles mosquitoes also have abdomens with pointed tips.
 
Culex:These mosquitoes breed in quiet, standing water, and include the Northern House Mosquito. They are weak flyers, and live only a few weeks during the summer. They prefer birds over humans, and attack at dawn or after dusk. Their abdomens have blunt tips.
 
Like all insects, mosquitoes hatch from eggs and go through several stages in their life cycle before becoming adults. The females lay their eggs in water, and the larva and pupa stages live entirely in water. When the pupa change into adults, they leave the water and become free-flying land insects. The life cycle of a mosquito can vary from one to several weeks depending upon the species. The adult, mated females of some species can survive the winter in cool, damp places until spring, when they will lay their eggs and die.